---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tracking Code: Standard (Asynchronous) "Retargeting" ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Surface Water Reservoirs and Rainfall Enhance Water Reliability

Across the San Diego region, two dozen surface water reservoirs serve a variety of purposes, including storing imported water and capturing runoff from local rainfall. These reservoirs have a combined capacity of about 723,000 acre-feet. On average, the semi-arid San Diego area receives just over 10 inches of rain annually as measured at the Lindbergh Field weather station situated on the coast – while inland mountain areas can receive more than three times this amount of rainfall.

Runoff from seven watersheds in the county provide inflow into several local impounding reservoirs, and the region’s ratepayers have also invested in reservoirs owned by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Additionally, the Water Authority is seeking a storage account in Lake Mead as a low-cost way to increase reserves and provide water to this federal drought-stricken reservoir.

Want to learn more and dig deeper?

download this documentReservoirs & Rainfall Fact Sheet

Historical Data

aerial of a reservoir
Reservoirs

Across the San Diego region, two dozen surface water reservoirs serve a variety of purposes, including storing imported water and capturing runoff from local rainfall.

rain droplots running off a leaf
Rainfall

On average, the semi-arid San Diego area receives just over 10-inches of rain annually as measured at the Lindbergh Field weather station situated on the coast.