Water Purification Offers New Resource

By using water more than once, local water agencies will be able to generate billions of gallons of water each year, helping the semi-arid region continue to thrive.

Purifying water for reuse — also referred to as potable reuse — relies on a multi-barrier treatment process to make recycled water safe to drink. Purified water produced in California with state-of-the-art technologies is higher quality than most bottled water.

Leaders In Potable Reuse

For more than two decades, water agencies in San Diego County have promoted water reuse as part of the region’s multi-faceted water supply diversification strategy. Today, about 80 percent of the region’s water supplies are transported hundreds of miles from the Colorado River and the State Water Project, which originates in Northern California.

In coming years, potable reuse projects are expected to help water agencies optimize existing infrastructure, increase locally controlled water supplies, and provide environmental benefits while continuing to protect public health. The Water Authority is working with its member agencies through the Potable Reuse Coordination Committee to support development of potable reuse projects in the San Diego region and develop a regulatory framework for direct potable reuse.

By supporting rigorous scientific analysis, securing money for studies, and sponsoring state legislation to speed the adoption of regulations, the Water Authority and its member agencies have become leading advocates for the next generation of locally controlled, drought-resilient drinking water supplies.

Want to learn more and dig deeper?

download this documentPotable Reuse Fact Sheet

Local Purification Projects

By using water more than once, local water agencies will be able to generate billions of gallons of water each year, helping the semi-arid region continue to thrive.

Today, leading water agencies in San Diego County are planning potable reuse projects that blend purified water with other drinking water supplies. The purification process relies on similar technology used to  turn seawater into drinking water at the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant, through filtration and reverse osmosis, plus an additional step using ultraviolet light to meet or exceed stringent standards for drinking water.

Local projects include: